Mosquitoes

Is Mosquito Season Getting Longer?

=We all hate them. The dreaded flying pests of summer. The scourge of picnics, barbecues, and bonfires. They pester people by leaving itchy red bites and in rare cases, can even transmit dangerous disease. We’re talking about the mosquito, of course, but at least these insects tend to go away by the end of summer… or at least, that’s what it used to feel like

Is mosquito season getting longer? Keep reading for what you need to know, courtesy of our expert pest control technicians at proof. pest control.

Why Does It Feel Like Mosquito Season Is Getting Longer?

In short, mosquito season is getting longer because the climate is getting hotter. These insects thrive in muggy, humid weather, and as the effects of climate change intensify, and warmer temperatures are more common even in places they weren’t before, mosquitoes have been able to stick around longer from year to year. A study done by Climate Central in 2020 found that in 64% of sites surveyed, mosquito activity rose steadily between the 1980s and the 2010s. Regions that have seen a particularly high climb in mosquito frequency include the Pacific Coast, Southeast, and Northeast, where temperatures often remain between 50 and 95 degrees (the ideal range for mosquitoes.) Meanwhile, large swaths of the south have not seen a great rise in mosquitoes, as their summers are often too hot for these insects to survive for long.

Of course, climate change isn’t the only factor that can drive an increase in mosquito activity. The moisture levels of any given area also affect the mosquito population, which is why you see fewer of these insects in dryer climates and more near bodies of water. At the end of the day, every part of the country is different, which is why mosquito season often changes from state to state. Keep reading to learn more about what mosquito season is like in your area, and remember that for reliable mosquito control and treatment, you can always count on our experts at proof. pest control.

Mosquito Season in the Southeast

In the southeastern part of the United States, including states like Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, and the Carolinas, it is often wet and humid for multiple parts of the year. Because of this, these states are often a perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes, and it is not uncommon to see mosquitoes in the Southwest for several months at a time. Broadly speaking, mosquito season in this region can now start anywhere between February and April, depending on how far north your state is. Eventually, when it starts to become cooler at night – roughly just below 50 degrees – the Southwest is likely to get some relief from mosquitoes. Yet in parts of this region, the sad reality is that mosquito season can now last pretty much all year-long.

Mosquito Season in the Northeast

The northeast has extremely hot summers, and with the abundance of water in this reason, it is common to see an abundance of mosquitoes in New York, Pennsylvania, and other parts of New England. Also, this region has experienced more rain and storms in recent years, creating an environment that is even more hospitable for mosquito survival. On average, Northeast residents can now expect mosquito season to start in mid-April or early May, and last until mid- to late-October, when nighttime temperatures start to cool down. Of course, if it’s a warmer year with lots of rain, residents in this region may start to see mosquitoes through November.

Mosquito Season in the Midwest

While the Midwest is known for extremely cold winters and large rolling plains of land, it also experiences extremely hot summers. And while many states in the region are landlocked, there are also plenty of lakes in the Midwest, meaning that mosquitoes are extremely common in states like Wisconsin, the Dakotas, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. Like the Northwest, mosquito season now commonly starts in these states around mid-April or early May, when average temperatures first start to rise above that 50 degree mark. The end of mosquito season in the Midwest generally falls somewhere in the beginning-to-middle of October, depending on how long the warm weather lasts.

Mosquito Season in the Southwest

The Southwest is generally thought of as the region spanning from Southern California throughout Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Obviously, much of this area is characterized by arid deserts and hot summers, though if there is enough standing water, mosquitoes can still survive for quite a long time in these states. With warmer weather beginning early on in the southwest, mosquito season commonly starts in this region between February and April. Typically, the season will last through mid-October, with a potential dip during the high heat of summer. However, depending on precipitation, and how long it takes for these states to get cold at night, mosquito season can last in parts of the Southwest into early November and even December.

Mosquito Season in the Northwest

The Northwest region of the United States spans states including Washington, Oregon, Montana, and Idaho, not to mention Northern California. Like in the Southwest, it is common for mosquito season in this region to start in mid-April and last to early October, though it depends on how hot the year is. The good thing about living in the Northwest in relation to mosquitos though? The rainy season does not usually overlap with warmer temperatures, so humidity is generally not as intense here as in other parts of the country.

Mosquito Season in Hawaii & Alaska

You didn’t think we’d forget about the non-continental states, did you? Sure enough, Hawaii and Alaska are on opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to mosquito activity. Hawaii’s mosquito season can last from February to December (so pretty much all year,) while in Alaska, it is only common to see mosquitoes from June to August.

For more information on mosquitos and what you can do about them, call proof. pest control at (888) 658-5191, or contact us online.

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