According to a recent study, two of our service areas, Greater Detroit and Greater Boston, are two of the most mosquito-infested cities in the U.S.

While that doesn’t sound like fun, don’t cancel those backyard BBQs just yet.  

The following three tips will help you protect yourself from those pesky, picnic-destroyers.

DRAIN

Standing water around your home is a breeding ground for mosquitos. If you have any water-filled containers in your yard, make sure to empty them.

Mosquito.org recommends the following to help eliminate a mosquito-friendly environment:

  • dispose of old tires
  • clear roof gutters of debris
  • clean pet dishes regularly
  • empty children’s toys
  • change bird bath water once a week
  • turn up-side-down canoes and other boats

It is critical that you do not overlook even the smallest container. A tiny puddle of water can assist in the breeding process of many mosquitoes.

Many homes in our service areas have natural bodies of water around them. While these obviously cannot be drained, they can be treated to greatly reduce mosquito larvae.  

DRESS

When enjoying your beautiful deck and backyard, make sure to dress accordingly. Mosquito-appropriate attire includes loose, long, light-colored clothing. Loose clothing helps prevent mosquito “bites” as does long clothing. Finally, mosquitoes are naturally attracted to darker clothing, so wearing lighter colors helps reduce your chances of an unpleasant encounter.

While the foregoing tips may not jive with summer fashion, they will help cut down on the constant itching that accompanies mosquito bites.

DEET/DEFEND

It is recommended that you apply a repellant approved by the Environmental Protection Agency before venturing outdoors.

The EPA has approved four types of repellants: DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, and IR3535.

While residents and visitors can’t help but love Michigan and Massachusetts because of their natural, water-filled landscapes, these suggestions will go a long way in minimizing the frustration caused by mosquitoes.